Converting Mozilla's SVG implementation to Moz2D - part 2

This is part 2 of a pair of posts describing my work to convert Mozilla's SVG implementation to directly use Moz2D. Part 1 provided some background information and details about the process. This post will discuss the performance benefits of the conversion of the SVG code and future work.

Benefits

For the most part the performance improvements from the conversion to Moz2D were gradual; as code was incrementally converted, little by little gfxContext overhead was avoided. On doing an audit of our open SVG performance bugs it seems that painting performance is no longer one of the reasons that we perform poorly, except for when we us cairo backed DrawTargets (Linux, Windows XP and other Windows versions with blacklisted drivers), and with the exception of one bug that needs further investigation. (See below for the issues that still do causes SVG performance problems.)

Besides the incremental improvements, there have been a couple of interesting perf bumps that are worth mentioning.

The biggest perf bump by far came when I converted the code that does the actual filling and stroking of SVG geometry to directly use a DrawTarget. The time taken to render this map then dropped from about 15s to 1-2s on my Mac. On the same machine Chrome Canary shows a blank window for about 5s, and then takes a further 20s to render. Now, to be honest, this improvement will be down to something pathological that has been removed rather than being down to avoiding Thebes overhead. (I haven't got to the bottom of exactly what that was yet.) The DrawTarget object being drawn to is ultimately the same object, and Thebes overhead isn't likely to be more than a few percent of any time spent in this code. Nevertheless, it's still a welcome win.

Another perf bump that came from the Moz2D conversion was that it enabled us to cache path objects. When using Thebes, paths are built up using gfxContext API calls and the consumer never gets to touch the resulting path. This prevents the consumer from keeping hold of the path and reusing it in future. This can be a disadvantage when the path is reused frequently, especially when D2D is being used where path creation is relatively expensive. Converting to Moz2D has allowed the SVG code to hold on to the path objects that it creates and reuse them. (For example, in addition to their obvious use during rasterization, paths might be reused for bounds calculations (think invalidation areas, objectBoundingBox content, getBBox() calls) and hit-testing.) Caching paths made us noticeably more responsive on this cool data visualization (temporarily mirrored here while the site is down) when mousing over the table rows, and gave us a +25% boost on this NYT article, for example.

For those of you that are interested in Talos, I did take a look at the SVG test data, but the unfortunately frequent up-and-down of unrelated regressions and wins makes it impossible to use that to show any overall impact of Moz2D conversion on the Talos tests. (Since the beginning of the year the times on Windows have improved slightly while on Mac they have regressed slightly.) The incremental nature of most of the work also unfortunately meant that the impact of individual patches couldn't usually be distinguished from the noise in Talos' results. One notable exception was the change to make SVG geometry use a path object directly which resulted in an improvement in the region of 6% for the svg_opacity suite on Windows 7 and 8.

Other than the performance benefits, several parts of the SVG implementation that were pretty messy and hard to get into and debug have become a lot more approachable. This has already allowed me to fix various SVG bugs that would otherwise have taken a lot longer to work out, and I hope it makes the code easier to approach for devs who aren't so familiar with it.

One final note on performance for any of you that will do your own testing to compare build - note that the enabling of e10s and tiled layers has caused significant changes in performance characteristics. You might want to turn those off.

Future SVG work

As I noted above there are still SVG performance issues unrelated to graphics speed. There are three sources of significant SVG performance issues that can make Mozilla perform poorly on SVG relative to other implementations. There is our lack of hardware acceleration of SVG filters; there's the issue of display list overhead dwarfing painting on SVGs that contain huge numbers of elements (display lists being an implementation detail, and one that gave us very large wins in many other cases); and there are a whole bunch of "strange" bugs that I expect are related to our layers infrastructure that are causing us to over invalidate (and thus do work painting when we shouldn't need to).

Currently these three issues are not on a schedule, but as other higher priority Mozilla work gets ticked of I expect we'll add them.

Future Moz2D work

The performance benefits from the Moz2D conversion on the SVG code do seem to have been positive enough that I expect that we will continue converting the rest of layout in the future. As usual, it will all depend on relative priorities though.

One thing that we should do is audit all the code that creates DrawTargets to check for backend type compatibility. Mixing hardware and software backed DrawTargets when we don't need to can cause us to unwittingly be taking big performance hits due to readback from and/or upload to the GPU. I fixed several instances of mismatch that I happened to notice during the conversion work, and in one case accidentally introduced one which fortunately was caught because it caused a 10-25% regression in a specific Talos test. We know that we still have outstanding bugs on this (such as bug 944571) and I'm sure there are a bunch of cases that we're unaware of.

I mentioned above that painting performance is still a significant issue on machines that fall back to using cairo backed DrawTargets. I believe that the Graphics team's plan to solve this is to finish the Skia backend for Moz2D and use that on the platforms that don't support D2D.

There are a few things that need to be added to Moz2D before we can completely get rid of gfxContext. The main thing we're missing is push-group API on DrawTarget. This is the main reason that gfxContexts actually wraps a stack of DrawTargets, which has all sorts of irritating fallout. Most annoying it makes it hazardous to set clip paths or transforms directly on DrawTargets that may be accessed via a wrapping gfxContext before the DrawTarget's clip stack and transform has been restored, and why I had to continue passing gfxContexts to a lot of code that now only paints directly via the DrawTarget.

The only Moz2D design decision that I've found myself to be somewhat unhappy with is the decision to make patterns relative to user-space. This is what most other hardware accelerated libraries do, but I don't think it's a good fit for 2D browser rendering. Typically crisp rendering is very important to web content, so we render patterns assuming a specific user-space to device-space transform and device space pixel alignment. To maintain crisp rendering we have to make sure that patterns are used with the device-space transform that they were created for, and having to do this manually can be irksome. Anyway, it's a small detail, but something I'll be discussing with the Graphics guys when I see them face-to-face in a couple of weeks.

Modulo the two issues above (and all the changes that I and others had made to it over the last year) I've found the Moz2D API to be a pleasure to work with and I feel the SVG code is better performing and a lot cleaner for converting to it. Well done Graphics team!

Comments

You should say that performance improvements are in nightly and not the regular channel.

The map opens instantly on nightly v36 but takes a long time on version v33.

Good point, I should have mentioned that. Thanks, Rik.

for the slow display-list building, do you think https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=884148 is good enough to look further into ?

It would help somewhat, but a lot of the overhead is in comparing data to check whether the display lists or layer tree need to change, and it wouldn't help with that. It also wouldn't help with the initial painting while a page loads, and how fast a page loads is important.

Is there any ETA for the complete conversion of SVG to Moz2d ? and for the complete layout to use Moz2d ?

The SVG code is pretty much done with the exception of things waiting for push-group API to be added to Moz2D. When I last checked with Bas a few weeks ago he didn't expect to get around to adding that API for at least 3-6 months.

The rest of the layout code has no schedule or ETA right now. I and others have converted bits and pieces of it, but any concerted effort will have to be balanced with other priorities, and will likely wait for the push-group API. My rough feeling for timescale is that it's unlikely we'll completely get rid of gfxContext before this time next year.

I just wanted to say thanks for improving SVG performance since we are increasing usage of it for the Firefox front-end to more easily support the various dppx values across operating systems.

Thanks, Matt. Keep filing bugs when you find examples of SVG where the performance is not what it should be. Same goes for everyone else:

https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/enter_bug.cgi?product=Core&component=SVG

Add new comment